Chateau Dietrich

If You Would Like to Hear This Record

Because of various problems with public blogs and rights problems, I have decided to take my blog and convert it to a private email. If you’d like to listen to this album (and more) or any other album I am posting here, just send me your email address at radiovickers1@gmail.com and I will put you on my list. Along with this album, I have a gigantic archive of my vinyl digitizations that gets added to every week. I do them myself and de-click them. Most sound pretty darned good, if I do say so myself.
This is not some come on. Just caution on my part. It costs nothing and there’s nothing to join. Just an email address. I have about a hundred people on my list at the moment. Come and join the musical fun.


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Sunday, May 11, 2014

My Vinyl Attic - Positive Noise - Change of Heart (1982)



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A1Feel The Fear3:45
A2Get Up And Go!4:04
A3Inhibitions4:06
A4Obsession3:13
A5Hanging On3:26
B1Positive Negative2:43
B2Waiting For The 7th Man3:05
B3Out Of Reach3:34
B4Tension2:46
B5Change Of Heart



 Info stolen from This Great Site

Positive Noise were a new wave and synthpop band from Scotland who had a number of indie hits in the 1980s. They released three albums and several singles and were together for over five years

The band was formed in 1979 by Ross Middleton (vocals), his brothers Graham Middleton (keyboards, vocals) and Fraser Middleton (bass guitar, vocals), Russell Blackstock (guitar, vocals), and Les Gaff (drums). Their first released material was two tracks ("Refugees" and "The Long March") on the Statik label compilation album Second City Statik in 1980, and they followed this with two singles on Statik in 1981, both of which were top-ten hits on the UK Independent Chart. D├ębut album Heart of Darkness was released in May 1981, after which Ross left to form the short-lived Leisure Process, with Blackstock taking over on lead vocals. Heart of Darkness peaked at number four on the independent chart, and the band's second album,Change of Heart (1982), also charted, reaching number 21.[3] They released a third and final album, Distant Fires, in 1985, now with John Telford on drums and John Coletta on guitar, but their earlier success was not repeated and they split up shortly afterwards.
Ross Middleton had earlier worked as a music journalist, writing for Sounds under the pen name Maxwell Park.

 

My Vinyl Attic - Johnny Mathis - Swing Softly (1958)



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  1. "You Hit the Spot" - 2:52
  2. "It's De-Lovely" - 2:47
  3. "Get Me to the Church on Time" - 1:45
  4. "Like Someone in Love" - 2:40
  5. "You'd Be So Nice to Come Home To" - 2:12
  6. "Love Walked In" - 2:38
  7. "This Heart of Mine" - 2:31
  8. "To Be in Love" - 3:01
  9. "Sweet Lorraine" - 2:24
  10. "Can't Get Out of This Mood" - 3:08
  11. "I've Got the World on a String" - 3:11
  12. "Easy to Say (But Hard to Do)" - 2:44


Info stolen from This Great Site

Swing Softly is the sixth album released by Johnny Mathis. It was his fifth original studio album (following the singles compilation Johnny's Greatest Hits).
 Departing from the lush ballad format of his previous pop albums "Wonderful Wonderful" and "Warm", Mathis proved that he could handle lightly swinging uptempo material in a credible fashion. Under the musical direction of Percy Faith, Mathis' expert vocals skillfully merge pop and jazz in the same way that established artists such as Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, Doris Day and Rosemary Clooney were doing around this time. This was quite a feat considering that Mathis was only 23 in 1958 and had only been recording for two years at this point.
 The album's strong sales continued Mathis' consecutive album chart entries peaking at #6 on the Billboard album chart in its original release
 The album features many songs considered standards by composers such as Cole Porter "(It's De-Lovely" and "You'd Be So Nice to Come Home To") and Harold Arlen ("I've Got the World on a String") while featuring Mathis' first recording of a George Gershwin song ("Love Walked In"). A self confessed fan of Nat King Cole, Mathis included a cover version of the Cole classic "Sweet Lorraine" on this album. The album also features songs originating from Hollywood ("This Heart of Mine") and Broadway ("Get Me to the Church on Time").

My Vinyl Attic - Johnny Mathis - I'll Buy You A Star (1961)



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  1. "I'll Buy You a Star" - 3:20
  2. "Stairway to the Stars" - 4:51
  3. "When My Sugar Walks Down the Street" - 3:30
  4. "Magic Garden" - 3:58
  5. "Smile" - 3:15
  6. "Oh, How I Try" - 3:40
  7. "Ring the Bell" - 1:57
  8. "Love Look Away" - 3:28
  9. "Sudden Love" - 3:28
  10. "The Best Is Yet to Come" - 3:42
  11. "Warm and Willing" - 3:13
  12. "My Heart and I" - 3:29


Info stolen from This Great Site

 I'll Buy You a Star is the fourteenth album released by Johnny Mathis. It is the twelfth original studio album recorded by him (two hit singles compilations "Johnny's Greatest Hits" and "More Johnny's Greatest Hits" were among his album releases to this point).
 I'll Buy You a Star is the first of two album collaborations with legendary arranger and conductor Nelson Riddle. The involvement of Riddle, who had previously worked with such musical heavyweights as Frank Sinatra, Nat King Cole, Ella Fitzgerald, Judy Garland, and Peggy Lee shows the stature of Mathis in the music world in 1961. As with his previous album, Johnny's Mood, Mathis chose to record a collection of songs ranging from standards and film songs through to less well known material. In a departure from the winning Mathis ballad album formula, this album includes both ballads and swinging uptempo material.

This album was the thirteenth consecutive Johnny Mathis album to chart. Unlike his previous albums that had all peaked in the top 10, this set peaked at a respectable #38 on the Billboard album chart in its original release


The title song, from the 1951 Broadway musical "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn", gets the album off to a solid swinging start. This is followed by a lush, romantic treatment of the standard "Stairway to the Stars" which finds Mathis recreating the high note re-entry following the orchestral bridge that had been such a feature of his classic version of "Misty". The song "Smile" has a melody by film great Charlie Chaplin while the rare verse is included on "When My Sugar Walks Down the Street". The less well known "Magic Garden" has lyrics by Alan and Marilyn Bergman the lyric writing husband and wife team whose work has often been recorded by Mathis while "Love Look Away" from Rodgers and Hammerstein's musical "Flower Drum Song" was a particular favourite with Mathis' British fans and is the second song from that show recorded by the singer. Finally, "The Best is Yet to Come" was one of the newer songs included on the album and was made popular by both Tony Bennett and Frank Sinatra.
Polly Bergen and her father, Bill Bergen, performed a duet of "I'll Buy You a Star" on her 1957-58 variety show, The Polly Bergen Show, which aired on NBC.
When the album first appeared on CD in 1996, it included four bonus tracks by Mathis and Riddle recorded during the album sessions but originally released as singles. Those four tracks would appear on later compilations of Mathis work. Both "Jenny" and "Should I Wait (Or Should I Run to Her)" appeared on Mathis' very next album Portrait of Johnny in 1961 while "Wasn't the Summer Short" was included on 1963's Johnny's Newest Hits and "Wherever You Are It's Spring" was part of the 1964 set I'll Search My Heart and Other Great Hits.


My Vinyl Attic - Buzzy Linhart - Pussycats Ca Go Far (1974)



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 01. shoo that fly.mp3
02. see you again (medium fox trot).mp3
03. there it goes again.mp3
04. you dont have to tell me goodbye.mp3
05. pussycats can go far.mp3
06. friends.mp3
07. the greatest person i know.mp3
08. if you can't join 'em, beat 'em.mp3
09. a tear outweighs a smile.mp3
10. tell me ive been trying.mp3
11. the justice game.mp3

Info stolen from This Great Site
 
The fourth album from Buzzy Linhart in a five-year period, this one on Atlantic records in 1974, is a mellow and enjoyable collection of pop songs with Linhart's distinctive voice and creative lyrics. The title track, espousing the philosophy that nice guys finish first, or at least somewhere on the upside, sets the tone for the rest of the disc. There's a cute white kitty cat snuggling up against Linhart's white shirt on the back cover, while a caricature of the artist on the cover has him looking like the son of the Cowardly Lion from The Wizard of Oz. There's a delicate version of "Friends" which ends side one, a little longer than the one which appears on his Kama Sutra release, The Time to Live Is Now; with vibes and subdued backing vocalists, the song is always a treat. This album was released around the time Bette Midler hit the Top 40 with that track -- indeed, there are two versions on her LP The Divine Miss M., and a different mix for Midler's 45 rpm which climbed the charts. "The Greatest Person I Know" has that Muscle Shoals atmosphere producers/musicians Barry Beckett and Roger Hawkins bring to the table, recorded at Muscle Shoals Sound Studios, of course. There are all sorts of guest stars: The Electric Flag's Barry Goldberg playing piano on "Friends," Carole Bayer Sager and Peter Allen adding backing vocals to that tune; Herbie Mann is found hitting a wastebasket with a baseball bat on "The Greatest Person I Know," while choral work from the Florence State University Singers really brings "If You Can't Beat 'Em, Join 'Em" to life. That Alabama sound is all over "A Tear Outweighs a Smile," the blues tune giving the other side of the title track's sentiment. What's great about this album are the dense liner notes which take the listener the 39 and a half minutes of playing time to get through. Lots of names are dropped, lots of wry humor, just like the music in the grooves. Pussycats Can Go Far deserves more than just its status as a collector's item of great music which makes the rounds on Ebay. The solid musicianship and innovative ideas deserved more chart activity and a number of follow-up albums.